WHO- The New Indian Express

Express press service

NEW DELHI: On the eve of the crucial climate talks of the United Nations Conference of the Parties on Climate Change (COP27), the World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a grim reminder that the climate crisis continues to render sick people, endangers lives and that health must be at the heart of these crucial negotiations. Noting that the conference, being held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, from 6-18 November, must conclude with progress on the four key objectives – mitigation, adaptation, finance and collaboration. The WHO said this is a crucial opportunity for the world to come together and commit to maintaining the Paris Agreement target of 1.5°C.

“The growing destruction from extreme weather events is affecting poor and marginalized communities,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, adding: “It is crucial that leaders and decision-makers come together at COP27 to place health at the heart of the negotiations. .” The United Nations Conference of the Parties on Climate Change (COP27), which will be attended by around 100 Heads of State and Government, will discuss key issues such as the urgent reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the strengthening of resilience and adaptation to the inevitable impacts of climate change, to meet climate finance commitments in developing countries.

“Our goal will be to put the health threat of the climate crisis, and the huge health gains that would come from stronger climate action, at the center of discussions,” a statement said. “Our health depends on the health of the ecosystems around us, and they are now threatened by deforestation, agriculture and other changes in land use. Encroachment on animal habitats increases viruses harmful to humans,” he said.

Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause around 250,000 additional deaths per year from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress. Direct health damage costs (i.e., excluding costs in health-determining sectors such as agriculture, water and sanitation) are estimated to be between 2 and 4 billion a year by 2030, he added. The WHO said encouraging progress had also been made on decarbonization commitments and called for the creation of a fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty that would see coal and other fossil fuels harmful to the world. atmosphere disposed of fairly and equitably.

“There are proven interventions that can reduce emissions of short-lived climate pollutants, for example by applying higher standards for vehicle emissions, which have been calculated to save 2.4 million lives a year, thanks improving air quality and reducing global warming by around 0.5°C. by 2050,” the WHO said.

NEW DELHI: On the eve of the crucial climate talks of the United Nations Conference of the Parties on Climate Change (COP27), the World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a grim reminder that the climate crisis continues to render sick people, endangers lives and that health must be at the heart of these crucial negotiations. Noting that the conference, being held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, from 6-18 November, must conclude with progress on the four key objectives – mitigation, adaptation, finance and collaboration. The WHO said this is a crucial opportunity for the world to come together and commit to maintaining the Paris Agreement target of 1.5°C. “The growing destruction from extreme weather events is affecting poor and marginalized communities,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, adding: “It is crucial that leaders and decision-makers come together at COP27 to place health at the heart of the negotiations. .” The United Nations Conference of the Parties on Climate Change (COP27), which will be attended by around 100 Heads of State and Government, will discuss key issues such as the urgent reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the strengthening of resilience and adaptation to the inevitable impacts of climate change, to meet climate finance commitments in developing countries. “Our goal will be to put the health threat of the climate crisis, and the huge health gains that would come from stronger climate action, at the center of discussions,” a statement said. “Our health depends on the health of the ecosystems around us, and they are now threatened by deforestation, agriculture and other changes in land use. Encroachment on animal habitats increases viruses harmful to humans,” he said. Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to lead to around 250,000 additional deaths per year from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress. Direct health damage costs (i.e., excluding costs in health-determining sectors such as agriculture, water and sanitation) are estimated to be between 2 and 4 billion a year by 2030, he added. The WHO said encouraging progress had also been made on decarbonization commitments and called for the creation of a fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty that would see coal and other fossil fuels harmful to the world. atmosphere disposed of fairly and equitably. “There are proven interventions that can reduce emissions of short-lived climate pollutants, for example by applying higher standards for vehicle emissions, which have been calculated to save 2.4 million lives a year, thanks improving air quality and reducing global warming by around 0.5°C. by 2050,” the WHO said.

Jessica C. Bell