Abortion becomes hot topic of debate as SCOTUS adds extra day of opinions

On Monday, the The Supreme Court has added additional publication of opinions to its schedule for this week, possibly including the decision that could overturn Roe v. Wade.

According to an update on the High Court’s website, there are still 30 opinions due in the final weeks of the term, with several now to be published on Wednesday.

While June is usually a busy month at the Supreme Court, this year is especially busy as the nine justices redefine social issues like abortion and attempt to restore legitimacy to federal justice after last month’s leak. .

After Politico released a leaked copy of a draft judgment showing the Tory court 6-3 overturning Roe v. Wade — the 1973 case that legalized abortion federally — nationwide unrest erupted in early May.

On Monday morning, the court issued three opinions.
Other scheduled rulings include those on the Second Amendment, religious freedoms, immigration and climate change, in addition to abortion.

In the aftermath of the extraordinary leak and two mass shootings, including the Texas massacre that killed 19 fourth- and fifth-grade children last month, the entire landscape of the debate has changed.

As a result of this violation, abortion became a hot topic of debate and states began to enact their own health care legislation.

If the verdict is overturned, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre has denounced Louisiana’s new law, which would toughen criminal penalties for health care providers who perform abortions.

The Supreme Court has added an extra day to its schedule on Monday, June 8, 2022, as it still has 30 opinions to render in the final weeks of the legislature.

The Supreme Court has added an extra day to its schedule on Monday, June 8, 2022, as it still has 30 opinions to render in the final weeks of the legislature.

The Supreme Court is normally busy in June, but it’s even busier this year as the nine justices redefine social issues like abortion and gun rights, and try to restore the reputation of federal justice after the leaked last month. Pictured: On Monday June 6, police arrested a pro-abortion activist who had chained his neck to the Supreme Court barrier erected last month.

The Supreme Court is normally busy in June, but it’s even busier this year as the nine justices redefine social issues like abortion and gun rights, and try to restore the reputation of federal justice after the leaked last month. Pictured: On Monday June 6, police arrested a pro-abortion activist who had chained his neck to the Supreme Court barrier erected last month.

In a statement on the law, President Joe Biden’s senior spokesman said, “The Louisiana Legislature has taken the latest step in a growing assault on basic American freedoms.” “Louisiana’s tough measure criminalizes abortion and punishes reproductive health practitioners with up to ten years in prison, with no exceptions for rape or incest.”

“The President is dedicated to upholding the constitutional rights of Americans, who have been protected by Roe for nearly 50 years, and to ensuring that women have the freedom to make their own decisions about their lives, bodies, and families,” she added.

“A large majority of Americans agree with and oppose such tough policies,” the report said.

Jean-Pierre refers to recent polls that show more than half of Americans support abortion and nearly two-thirds want Roe v. Wade be confirmed.
The Louisiana law was passed Thursday, increasing the maximum prison term for abortion providers from five to 10 years and increasing fines from $5,000 to $50,000 to $10,000 to $100,000.

According to a draft document released in May, those penalties would only take effect if the Supreme Court overturns the landmark Roe v. Wade abortion case, which is expected to happen later this month.

In a statement Monday, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre criticized a new Louisiana bill that would toughen criminal penalties for abortion providers if Roe v. Wade was canceled.

In a statement Monday, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre criticized a new Louisiana bill that would toughen criminal penalties for abortion providers if Roe v. Wade was canceled.

“The Louisiana Legislature has taken the final step in a widening assault on basic American freedoms,” the report said. Jean Pierre wrote this

“The Louisiana Legislature has taken the final step in a widening assault on basic American freedoms,” the report said. Jean Pierre wrote this

Along with Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming, Louisiana is the one of 13 states with so-called “trigger laws.”

If Roe v. Wade is overthrown, these trigger laws would immediately ban all abortions.

The Supreme Court will issue its rulings for the term at the end of June, and one of the most anticipated outcomes is the complete reversal of the landmark 50-year-old abortion case that guaranteed a woman’s right to terminate her pregnancy under the law.

Last month, a draft opinion from conservative judge Samuel Alito was leaked suggesting an overturning of Roe v. Wade with the backing of three other conservative justices: Clarence Thomas, Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.

Chief Justice John Roberts has indicated he won’t support a full reversal, but he supports the Mississippi case that first took the case to the Supreme Court, which would make abortion illegal after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

Roberts’ departure had little bearing on the outcome as the Supreme Court has a 6-3 conservative majority.

Roberts launched an investigation into the once leaked draft notice, while confirming the veracity of the document, which Politico released in early May. The most likely source of the leak, investigators say, is a recent law school graduate clerk, of whom each judge normally has four.

The Louisiana law, which has passed the state Senate but has yet to be approved by the governor, would increase prison terms from five to 10 years and fines from $5,000 to $50,000 at $10,000 to $100,000. On Thursday, May 12, 2022, pro-life activists rallied outside the Louisiana Capitol in support of the law.

The Louisiana law, which has passed the state Senate but has yet to be approved by the governor, would increase prison terms from five to 10 years and fines from $5,000 to $50,000 at $10,000 to $100,000. On Thursday, May 12, 2022, pro-life activists rallied outside the Louisiana Capitol in support of the law.

On May 14, 2022, pro-abortion protesters in New Orleans, Louisiana cheer during nationwide rallies in support of Roe v. Wade.

On May 14, 2022, pro-abortion protesters in New Orleans, Louisiana cheer during nationwide rallies in support of Roe v. Wade.

Louisiana Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards has not yet announced whether he will veto legislation passed by his state Senate last week.

Edwards has previously said he supports exclusions of abortion for rape and incest, but would still support the measure without any revisions, even if those exceptions are not included.

“Vetoing the law wouldn’t get me what I want, which is the rape and incest exceptions,” Edwards said at a press conference Thursday.

The law was proposed by Louisiana State Senator Katrina Jackson, a Democrat. On the House floor, it was significantly amended, adding 15 pages to the five-page act.

The amendments made exceptions for situations in which the mother’s life is in danger or the fetus has a defect that prevents it from living outside the womb.

The measure does not make it illegal for women to have abortions; it only makes it illegal for abortion providers to conduct the procedure.

A “person”, according to Louisiana criminal law, is “a human being from the time of fertilization and implantation”.

If Roe v. Wade is overturned, the issue of abortion will be deferred to the states, which means Republican states will likely have stricter regulations, ranging from outright bans to permitted abortion right up to the time of birth, while blue states can abort. lawful until the moment of birth.

Democratic pockets of the red state have pledged to act as “sanctuaries” for abortion rights.

In response to public anger over the leaked draft notice, blue cities in red states have said that if abortion is made illegal at the state level, they will not sue.

Austin, Texas city council member José ‘Chito’ Vela sponsored a resolution that would decriminalize abortion at the local level if the state banned it outright.

Roe v. Wade is supported by more than two-thirds of Americans…
The economy is on the minds of eight out of ten Americans.

According to a Wall Street Journal poll, 68% of Americans — more than two-thirds — want the Supreme Court to uphold Roe v. Wade in order to maintain abortion rights protections at the federal level.

According to a Wall Street Journal poll, 68% of Americans — more than two-thirds — want the Supreme Court to uphold Roe v. Wade in order to maintain abortion rights protections at the federal level.
Texas already has some of the most draconian abortion laws in the country.

Abortion is currently prohibited when a fetal heartbeat is detected, which occurs around the sixth week of a pregnancy. At this point in the first trimester, many women seeking an abortion do not know they are pregnant.

Vela spokeswoman Jenna Hanes said her office has been in contact with lawmakers in a number of Texas cities, including Dallas, San Antonio and Houston, who want to pass similar privacy protection legislation. ‘abortion.

These “sanctuary cities” are a play on the term “sanctuary cities,” which was used to describe cities that refused to cooperate with the federal government in immigration enforcement.

Prosecutors in New Orleans, Louisiana, Nashville, Tennessee, DeKalb County, Georgia, east of Atlanta, Fairfax County, Virginia, and Durham County, Carolina of the North, all said that abortion-related crimes would not be a priority.

Some have stated unequivocally that such bans will not be enforced.

“I will not shift priority from confronting the shootings, rapes and carjackings to investigating the decisions women make about their own bodies,” the New York Parish District Attorney said. Orleans, Jason Roger Williams.

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Jessica C. Bell